Prosecuting Conflict-Related Sexual Violence

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The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has been at the forefront of advancing international criminal law with respect to the prosecution of those accused of crimes of sexual and gender-based violence during conflict.

As the work of the ICTY draws to a close the prosecutors have considered the legacy and lessons of their experience, and produced Prosecuting Conflict-Related Sexual Violence at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (OUP 2016).

Inspired by the book and accompanying PSV network, this conference will spotlight experiences and challenges in prosecuting sexual violence crimes at the ICTY and beyond.

Prosecutors, judges, advocates and practitioners will reflect on lessons learned from international, regional and hybrid tribunals and highlight specific experience from local jurisdictions.

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16 June 2016
9am-6pm

LSE campus
Central London

 The conference will feature panels on:

  • Challenges in investigating and prosecuting at the international level
  • Limitations in the legal framework
  • Experiences from international tribunals and national courts
  • Reparations and transformative justice

Access to the conference is limited, and pre-registration is essential. Register your interest via the eventbrite page using the password ‘WPSEndSVC’.

Speakers include:

Laurel Baig; Louise Chappell; Carla Ferstman; Hassan B. Jallow; Teresa Fernández Paredes; Priya Gopalan; Adrijana Hanušić Bećirović; Michelle Jarvis; Daniela Kravetz; Julissa Mantilla; Maxine Marcus; Patricia Sellers; Lada Soljan; Keina Yoshida. Read more about the speakers.

 The conference marks, a few days early, International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict . 19 June commemorates the adoption in 2008 of UN Security Council resolution 1820, which recognised sexual violence as a tactic of war and a threat to global peace and security, requiring an operational security, justice and service response.  It further recognised that rape and other forms of sexual violence can constitute war crimes, crimes against humanity and/or constitutive acts of genocide.